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Dr. Len's Cancer Blog

The American Cancer Society

New Report On Smoking In Women Confirms That "Women Who Smoke Like Men Die Like Men"

by Dr. Len January 23, 2013

"You've come a long way baby!"

That slogan from decades ago now returns with a new meaning and a new vengeance, according to a study released today in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The report, co-authored by Michael Thun, the recently retired vice president emeritus of the American Cancer Society along with colleagues from several outstanding institutions in the United States, shows clearly and unfortunately that women who are smokers are now neck and neck with men smokers when it comes to the relative risk of dying compared to non-smokers, whether it is from all causes, lung cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease (emphysema), and cardiovascular diseases including heart disease and stroke. (See below for an explanation of relative risk)

In a somewhat unvarnished tone, the authors write, "This finding is new and confirms the prediction that, in relative terms, 'women who smoke like men die like men.'" More...

Filed Under:

Lung Cancer | Prevention | Tobacco

New Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines From The American Cancer Society: What You Should Know

by Dr. Len January 10, 2013

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in this country. In 2012, the American Cancer Society estimates that there were about 226,000 people newly diganosed with lung cancer, and 160,000 deaths. If there is good news here-and unfortunately there isn't much good news when it comes to lung cancer-it is that deaths from this dreaded disease have been declining in men and women, since fewer people are smoking. But there is much we have to do to improve this picture.

That's one of the reasons the American Cancer Society is releasing new guidelines on screening for lung cancer. After carefully reviewing the available research, the Society has concluded that there is good evidence that lung cancer screening saves lives by reducing deaths from lung cancer (20% in largest carefully controlled study) in people at high risk when the screening is done by experienced, high-volume lung cancer screening programs.

So who should be screened? Who is at high risk?

According to the guidelines, those for whom lung cancer screening with low-dose chest CT scans are appropriate are people who are between the ages of 55 and 74 and who have smoked 30 pack years (a pack year is one pack of cigarettes a day for one year) or more or who have smoked 30 pack years in the past and quit within the last 15 years and are now within that age range. Those individuals who meet those criteria-should they choose to be screened-should have a low dose chest CT scan every year until age 74.

However, this isn't a blanket recommendation. There are other cautions in the guidelines that you should know about. More...

Annual Report to the Nation on Cancer Trends: Cancer Deaths Continue to Fall, But We Can Do Better

by Dr. Len January 07, 2013

The positive news continues: cancer death rates have continued to fall in the United States, for men and women, maintaining a trend that began in the early 1990's. That's the essence of a report released today by the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

The report, titled in part "Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2009" also features a special section on the burden and trends in Human Papilloma virus (HPV) associated cancers and HPV vaccination coverage levels. Unlike the continuing decline in cancer deaths in the United States, we could be doing a much better job of getting young folks vaccinated against HPV and reducing the incidence and death rates from several HPV-associated cancers, according to the authors of the report and an editorial that accompanied the report.

This report comes out every year. It is a summation of what we know about the trends in incidence rates for the most common cancers in the United States among both men and women as well as the trends in death rates from those cancers that lead to the highest mortality in the general population as well as specific ethnic groups. It is in a real sense a report card on our progress, which in large part is good but in a number of cancers, not so good.

The good news is what we have come to expect: since the year 2000, the overall cancer death rates have continued to decline 1.8% per year in men, 1.4% in women and 0.6% per year in children. That may not sound like much, but when you consider the fact that this is an average change seen every year, those numbers begin to add up. More...

About Dr. Len

Dr. Len

J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD, MACP - Dr. Lichtenfeld is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for the national office of the American Cancer Society.

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