Dr. Len's Cancer Blog

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Dr. Len's Cancer Blog

The American Cancer Society

Big Steps Forward In Melanoma Treatment But Tread Carefully

by Dr. Len June 02, 2014

The brave new world of melanoma treatment continues at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago. And notwithstanding the excitement, there are some other pieces of information around the edges that remind us once again that a breakthrough today may not be quite as promising when viewed a couple of years from now. More...

In An Era Of Bold New Cancer Treatments An Older Drug Shows Real Promise For Advanced Prostate Cancer

by Dr. Len June 02, 2014

The annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology here in Chicago is a place where many commercial interests jostle for attention to make their latest promising therapy the star of the show. But this weekend, a standard widely available generic drug stole the show by producing incredible results in improving survival for men with advanced prostate cancer. And that has some of us asking, "Why did it take so long to find out? More...

From The ASCO Meeting In Chicago: A Focus On Cost, Value, And Financial Toxicity Of Cancer Care

by Dr. Len May 31, 2014

At the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) here in Chicago, something vitally important is happening: there is an increasing recognition of something no one really wanted to talk about in polite company until now. It is the fact that the costs of many of the new treatments being developed are extraordinary.

The headlines about cost and value of cancer care greeted me when I walked into the McCormick Center in Chicago for the opening sessions of the meeting. This is the leading cancer meeting in the world, and what happens here makes news worldwide, significantly impacting the lives of patients with cancer wherever they may be.

Now there is an increasing recognition of the elephant in the room: the costs of these new treatments are extraordinary. No matter how one chooses to slice and dice the arguments, these drugs are expensive with costs per month of $8000 and upwards getting a lot of attention and increasing concerns, especially at this meeting. More...

The FDA Lays Down The Law About The Dangers Of Indoor Tanning

by Dr. Len May 29, 2014

In what has to be considered a major victory for those concerned about the proliferating use and risks of tanning beds, the Food and Drug Administration this week issued a final rule requiring devices used for indoor tanning to meet very specific requirements before they can be marketed to the public. And in what is probably an even more important part of the rule, they now instruct those who market tanning devices to consumers to warn them clearly about the very real and serious risks of indoor tanning. More...

"Don't Fry Day" Reminds Us To Take Care Of Our Skin Since It's The Only One We Get

by Dr. Len May 22, 2014

"Don't Fry Day," which we "celebrate" every year on the Friday before Memorial Day is an annual reminder to be good to the skin you're in. It's the only one you get. Wear it out or damage it and you don't get to replace it, like we do with heart valves, knees, hips, and so on.

This year Don't Fry Day is even more personal to me. After hounding all of you to be careful in the sun, I got a very personal reminder this past year of why that's important: two surgeries and two scars from removing skin cancers. One of those scars is pretty visible and a daily reminder of my own past unwise sun behavior. Like many folks, I'm glad the cancer is gone. But I also wish it hadn't been there in the first place.

The reality is that my generation had very little knowledge and very few options when it came to avoiding the dangers of too much sun exposure. We went outdoors, we went to the beach, we didn't have sunscreen, and we just lay there and took it. We thought we looked good. If we worked outdoors--like I did when I was in high school and college--we took our sunburn "lumps" early in the season then "built" a tan over the rest of the summer.

The rewards for our behavior? It certainly wasn't better health. We now have aging skin, with sunspots, wrinkles, and cancers to show for our efforts. And, unfortunately, we have also lost many friends, family, and others to serious skin cancers, such as melanoma. More...

We Need A Sense Of Urgency To Assure The Safety Of Health Information Technology

by Dr. Len May 16, 2014

This was the dream: we would use technology to create a seamless healthcare system, one where people, computers and machines would work together to improve patient care in many different ways. Health care would be more efficient, it would be safer, it would be less expensive, we would be able to transfer health-related information quickly and accurately.

After spending three days at a meeting this past week with some of the top experts in the field, I am not so certain that the dream is going to come true anytime soon. Perhaps more concerning, the problems--including patient safety issues--that are cropping up in so many areas are very troubling. More...

Relay For Life Is All About People Making A Difference In The Fight Against Cancer Every Day In So Many Ways

by Dr. Len May 11, 2014

My wife and I did something special this past Friday evening. We attended a Relay for Life in our hometown of Thomasville GA. And the memories of the event will not be soon forgotten, for so many reasons. More...

The Haunting Memories When Screening Doesn't Work

by Dr. Len March 27, 2014

I had the opportunity earlier this week to participate in a Twitter chat on the topic of colorectal cancer awareness. The chat was intended to bring attention to a nationwide campaign called "80 by 2018" designed to increase colorectal cancer screening rates to 80% of the population over the next 4 years. If it is successful, we should see a decline in both incidence and deaths from this disease.

But I am haunted by two of the comments I tweeted during the session chat that won't leave my conscience:

"As a doc, you don't forget the patients you couldn't help. And you celebrate those you did. #CRCawareness is key #80by2018"

"Let's remember that screening doesn't help everyone, so don't forget the need for more research in understanding #CRC #80by2018"

While we celebrate the opportunity to save more lives with screening, we cannot ignore or forget those for whom screening for colorectal cancer (or other cancers, for that matter) couldn't or didn't make a difference. More...

Progress In Colorectal Cancer Not Shared By Everyone

by Dr. Len March 19, 2014

An article published this week in the American Cancer Society journal CA: A Journal for Clinicians received a lot of media attention. The report showed dramatic declines in the rate of people being diagnosed with colorectal cancer, as well as decreases in the rates of colorectal cancer deaths over the past number of years.

But the press didn't say much about the fact that not everyone has benefitted from the progress we have made in the prevention, early detection, and improved treatment for colorectal cancer. It is a sad but very real commentary on how we approach health care in this country that African Americans have not benefitted equally from this progress in treating a cancer that for many people can be prevented or effectively treated when found before it spreads to other parts of the body.

As a nation, I believe it is incumbent that we address this glaring health disparity. To do less is unacceptable. More...

It Helps To Know What Watchful Waiting Really Means In Prostate Cancer Treatment

by Dr. Len March 06, 2014

News reports covering a prostate cancer study this week in the New England Journal of Medicine have all pretty much come out with the same message: men diagnosed with prostate cancer who had radical surgery did much better than men who were assigned to "watchful waiting" after they were diagnosed.

But guess what? There's a critical fact that seemed to be missing in much of the coverage I saw. And that fact is this: the men who were given the "watchful waiting" as described in the study never received any curative treatment. Let me repeat: No curative treatment. That is a much different approach to watchful waiting than we currently recommend in the United States, where watchful waiting after a diagnosis of prostate cancer usually means offering curative treatment when the prostate cancer changes its behavior. More...

About Dr. Len

Dr. Len

J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD, MACP - Dr. Lichtenfeld is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for the national office of the American Cancer Society.

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