Dr. Len's Cancer Blog

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Dr. Len's Cancer Blog

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Early detection (101 posts)  RSS

Laboratory Tests And Disruption In Medical Care: A New Frontier

by Dr. Len May 29, 2015

(This blog was originally published on Medpage Today and is presented here with permission)

 

Disruptive innovation is a relatively new term that refers to dynamic changes in how we live our lives. Think of your smartphone and you have a good example of disruptive technology; one that replaces old tools. Who even takes pictures with a point and shoot camera any more, or uses a map to find their way? But the rise of disruptive technologies in medicine to me raises some difficult questions.

The recent announcement by a company called Color Genomics which will provide a 19 gene assay to help women assess their risk of breast and ovarian cancer could be called a disruptive innovation. For $249, a woman can have this panel of tests done at her request so long as she has a health professional order it.

And if she doesn't have a health professional readily available, the company will be glad to provide one.

Oh, and by the way: they don't accept insurance. They reason: the company says the cost is so low that insurance companies shouldn't come between women and the test. And if you want genetic counseling, they will provide that too but only after the test is done -- which clearly contravenes the recommendations of a number of professional and voluntary health organizations.

Another example of disruption in the laboratory world is the anticipated onslaught of direct consumer availability of laboratory studies based on minimal amounts of blood, possibly at a pharmacy near you. It is not clear for now whether a health professional will be an intermediary, but the end goal is pretty clear that patients will have the opportunity to order their own labs when they want to get them. More...

Don't Fry Day Reminds Us To Stay Safe In The Sun

by Dr. Len May 20, 2015

It's that time of year again, those months we all look forward to when life (sometimes) gets a little bit slower, the days a bit longer, and many of us take (yes!!!!!) a vacation. It's also time for Don't Fry Day, which is the Friday before Memorial Day. That's the day when organizations including the American Cancer Society and led by the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention remind you to be sun safe, and know what to do to protect the skin you are in.

From an American Cancer Society perspective, the rules are pretty straight forward and easy to remember:

  • Slip! (on a shirt)
  • Slop! (on the sunscreen)
  • Slap! (on a wide brimmed hat), and
  • Wrap! (on a pair of UV protective sunglasses)

I could go through a long list of what you should do and how you should do it to protect your skin, but it's easier to go to our website or to the National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention website for that information. You should take the information to heart. Skin damage isn't a walk in the park (or on the beach, for that matter)-either now while you may be on vacation, or years later when you deal with the delayed effects such as skin aging, wrinkles, and-yes-skin cancer.

You can't be expected not to enjoy the outdoors. That's part of a healthy lifestyle. Staying inside day in and day out just isn't fun. Unless there is a reason you can't go out of doors, you should spend time outside. It's how you spend that time that can make all the difference. More...

The Fault In Our Stars: When Celebrity Health Advice Conflicts With Our Science

by Dr. Len May 14, 2015

Dealing with a diagnosis of cancer remains a very scary, emotionally charged experience. That experience is not helped by the addition of conflicting advice, especially advice based on opinion and not evidence. And once in a while, that's what happens when a celebrity is the source of the information, as has now occurred with Sandra Lee. But this time reporters are stepping up to address the issue on the record.

Many of you are familiar with the now widely available interview Ms. Lee gave with ABC's Good Morning America anchor Robin Roberts, herself a cancer survivor who has openly shared her journey with the public. Ms. Lee told the nation that she has breast cancer, that a lumpectomy had positive margins, and that her doctors recommended a double mastectomy since she was a "ticking time bomb" in her words.

What the nation also knows is that Ms. Lee at the age of 48 was critical of guidelines that-in her words-tell women to wait until they are 50 to get a screening mammogram. She also recommended that women of all ages, even in their 20s and 30s, call their health professional now and get a mammogram. In short, all women "need to know" whether or not they have breast cancer.

A diagnosis of breast cancer is traumatic. A positive mammogram that turns out not to be cancer--what doctors call a "false positive"--is also traumatic, especially if a women has to endure the uncertainty of follow-up tests including additional x-rays and biopsies, which are certainly uncomfortable at the least and disfiguring at the worst. Younger women have a greater number of false positive mammograms, in part because their breast tissue is more dense making the reading of a mammogram more difficult.

People are entitled to their opinions. But when personal thoughts turn into public pronouncements it can create a sense of fear and a sense of panic that may not be warranted. Often, listening to what the science tells us can help us confront some of that fear. In this case what the science tells us is that screening women in their 20s and 30s who are at average risk of breast cancer would cause a great deal of harm and not much benefit. More...

Are We Ready For Inexpensive, Patient Directed Genetic Testing For Breast Cancer?

by Dr. Len April 21, 2015

Years ago when I first started this blog I wrote about the democratization of information, and how people would come to an era where they had ready access to  information yet reserved  the right to determine whether that information was valid or not.

Fast forward to today, and a company called Color Genomics announced a new genomic based profile to measure breast cancer risk. They are clearly headed into the democratization of health care, since they are pricing the test at $249 and have tried to reduce the barriers for women and men to get the test.

Inevitably, this announcement is going to fan the flames of how far we should be going to allow people to get whatever laboratory tests they would like, whenever they want them. Although a health professional must order the test, in reality doctors will be available to meet your need if you decide to bypass your personal physician. And although most professional organizations active in this field recommend genetic counseling from a qualified professional be done  before such tests are done, the company says they will provide such counseling-after the test results are known. More...

Is It Time For Precision/Personalized Medicine?

by Dr. Len January 30, 2015

This blog was originally published on the Medpage Today website on January 22, 2015. It is reposted here with permission.

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Are we prepared for the genomics revolution?

The President's proposed Precision Medicine Initiative as mentioned in his recent State of the Union address suggests it's probably time to get ready for some changes in our daily routines as health professionals.

I'm not talking about the incredible information that has already been produced by researchers examining the human genome. Nor am I referring to the work that is going on in major cancer centers and elsewhere exploring how to better match patients with genomic analyses of their cancers, for example.

And I am not talking about the advances in targeted therapies associated with diagnostic tests that can help guide the treatment of patients with a variety of cancers including but not limited to lung and breast cancers as examples.

No, I am asking whether we are prepared to usher in the new era of medical practice where genomic analyses in one form or another will be a part of our everyday medical practice. It's not just about cancer, my friends. It will be coming to a primary care practice near you probably sooner than you realize -- but it is coming. More...

Number Of Skin Cancers And Costs Of Treatment Have Increased Dramatically Reinforcing Need For Prevention

by Dr. Len November 13, 2014

The numbers about skin cancer incidence and costs in the United States are worse than anyone expected.

That's the message that comes from a report published recently in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine on research from the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Cancer Institute.

The researchers took a look at the number of skin cancers--both melanoma and non-melanoma--that were diagnosed in the United States for two different periods of time, from 2002-2006 and 2007-2011. They also examined the total cost of care for the treatment of those patients.

The staggering reality is that the average number of skin cancers diagnosed in this country in people 18 and older went from 3.4 million per year during the first time frame to 4.9 million in the second period. That means through 2011 that close to 5,000,000 (yes, 5 million) adults have a skin cancer diagnosed every year-and today that number may even be higher. More...

Breast Cancer Awareness Is About More Than Mammograms: What You Need To Know

by Dr. Len October 02, 2014

It's October and that means we are about to see a lot of pink for the next 31 days. And virtually all of the work comes down to one simple -some might say overly simple-message: get a mammogram.

But as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM), begins, I find myself one again asking some difficult questions: Are we really looking at the right side of the equation? Is it all about mammograms? Is there more to the story? The answer is absolutely unequivocal and without a moments hesitation: YES! More...

Ultraviolet Bad: Surgeon General Issues A Call To Action To Prevent Skin Cancer

by Dr. Len July 31, 2014

(Note: This blog was originally published on another American Cancer Society website on July 29 because of technical problems on this site. Those have now been resolved and it is now reposted here. We appreciate your understanding.)

 

"Ultraviolet bad."

That was the core message that came out of the introduction Tuesday morning of the Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer at a meeting held at the National Press Club in Washington DC.

There were some other messages that now raise skin cancer awareness and prevention high on the public health awareness list, such as the fact that over 5 million people every year have a diagnosis of skin cancer (and many have more than one skin cancer), and that we are spending over $8 billion dollars treating the disease. But most important is the fact that this is one of the most preventable cancers, and if current trends are any indication we are not getting the job done when it comes to decreasing the number of skin cancers and saving lives. More...

Cancer and the Latino Community: Lessons Learned

by Dr. Len July 24, 2014

I had the privilege this week to serve as the keynote speaker for the 4th Summit sponsored by Latinas Contra Cancer-an organization founded and led by Ysabel Duron, a formidable cancer survivor and news media presence in San Francisco.

Bringing together members of the Latino community, researchers, community health workers, promotores (more on that later) and advocates, the summit focused on the issues facing the Latino community in increasing awareness, access to care, improved treatment and research opportunities among other topics. But what was most impressive was the spirit, engagement and commitment that permeated the room for the two days of the meeting.

I would like to share with you some of what I learned during the preparation for that lecture, as well as some observations that tie together the impact and calls to action that are relevant to the Latino community and many other ethnic and socioeconomic groups in the United States. (You may wish to refer to the American Cancer Society's "Cancer Facts and Figures for Hispanics/Latinos 2012-2014" which contains a wealth of information relative to cancer for this community.) More...

Social Media And Cancer Awareness: Are We Smart Enough To Take Advantage Of The Opportunity?

by Dr. Len June 17, 2014

This past week I had the privilege of participating in a meeting hosted by the President's Cancer Panel on the role of social media in improving cancer control and treatment. The goal was to give advice to the Panel on a planned series of meetings they will be convening to discuss the topic. It was the range and quality of the discussion that day that left me thinking about the broader topic of social media and how it could help improve cancer control going forward. More...

About Dr. Len

Dr. Len

J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD, MACP - Dr. Lichtenfeld is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for the national office of the American Cancer Society.

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