Dr. Len's Cancer Blog

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Dr. Len's Cancer Blog

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Breast Cancer Awareness Is About More Than Mammograms: What You Need To Know

by Dr. Len October 02, 2014

It's October and that means we are about to see a lot of pink for the next 31 days. And virtually all of the work comes down to one simple -some might say overly simple-message: get a mammogram.

But as National Breast Cancer Awareness Month (NBCAM), begins, I find myself one again asking some difficult questions: Are we really looking at the right side of the equation? Is it all about mammograms? Is there more to the story? The answer is absolutely unequivocal and without a moments hesitation: YES! More...

Is It Too Much To Expect More Balance When Discussing Proton Beam Therapy For Cancer Patients?

by Dr. Len September 30, 2014

I had an interesting day this past week. Sadly, it left me wondering why the same "hope and hype" directed at cancer patients and their families decades ago when I started my oncology career was still alive and well today. But then, maybe I am the naïve one to think that anything should have really changed.

In the morning I found out that a story I had been interviewed for a story which appeared on the Kaiser Health News website. A discussion about proton beam therapy for cancer (PBT), it basically pointed out that insurers aren't necessarily paying for the treatment and that the information supporting its use is not as definitive as some would hope or claim.

Not long after, I was informed of an online discussion  on Twitter (called a "tweet chat" at #protonbeam) being hosted by a major medical institution and a well-known weekly newsmagazine on the very topic of proton beam therapy, or PBT. What I watched unfold over the hour-long discussion was what I call a "scrum" of doctors and public relations people promoting proton beam therapy as the answer to many cancer treatment dilemmas with nary a word about the  limitations of our knowledge or potential problems with the treatment. It was all about "we can do it, call us and we will tell you how good we are, and insurers won't pay us." Simply stated, the "conversation" seemed to be glancing by some of the inconvenient facts surrounding what has become another poster story for how we develop and promote new treatments in medicine, let alone cancer care. More...

Gordon Klatt, MD: We Mourn The Loss Of A True American Hero

by Dr. Len August 07, 2014

We have lost a hero. A true hero. Not one whose name would be on the tip of everyone's tongue or whose passing would be on nationwide news, but a hero nonetheless. We have lost a man who possibly had more influence on the lives of cancer patients and advances in cancer than most of us will ever realize.

Gordon (Gordy) Klatt, MD died this week. A colorectal surgeon who lived in Tacoma, Washington, Dr. Klatt died from the very disease which he did so much to eradicate. And even while ill, he contributed time and effort tirelessly to the American Cancer Society and the very volunteers-like himself-who do so much to reduce the burden and suffering from cancer for so many.

Dr. Klatt is a hero because almost 30 years ago he had an idea and he acted on it. He decided to walk around a track for 24 hours to raise money for cancer care and cancer research. He was the founder and inspiration of the American Cancer Society's signature "Relay For Life," which has spread not only throughout the United States but now is found throughout the world.

If you ever wake up one day and say, "I have an idea," then become discouraged as you try to enable your dream, please don't ever forget Dr. Klatt. He had an idea, and his idea enabled the Society to raise the funds needed to meet cancer head on through research, education, advocacy, and service. That money has done more to support cancer patients and their families, advance cancer research and treatment, and improve the quality of life of cancer patients than you can ever imagine. More...

Ultraviolet Bad: Surgeon General Issues A Call To Action To Prevent Skin Cancer

by Dr. Len July 31, 2014

(Note: This blog was originally published on another American Cancer Society website on July 29 because of technical problems on this site. Those have now been resolved and it is now reposted here. We appreciate your understanding.)

 

"Ultraviolet bad."

That was the core message that came out of the introduction Tuesday morning of the Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent Skin Cancer at a meeting held at the National Press Club in Washington DC.

There were some other messages that now raise skin cancer awareness and prevention high on the public health awareness list, such as the fact that over 5 million people every year have a diagnosis of skin cancer (and many have more than one skin cancer), and that we are spending over $8 billion dollars treating the disease. But most important is the fact that this is one of the most preventable cancers, and if current trends are any indication we are not getting the job done when it comes to decreasing the number of skin cancers and saving lives. More...

Cancer and the Latino Community: Lessons Learned

by Dr. Len July 24, 2014

I had the privilege this week to serve as the keynote speaker for the 4th Summit sponsored by Latinas Contra Cancer-an organization founded and led by Ysabel Duron, a formidable cancer survivor and news media presence in San Francisco.

Bringing together members of the Latino community, researchers, community health workers, promotores (more on that later) and advocates, the summit focused on the issues facing the Latino community in increasing awareness, access to care, improved treatment and research opportunities among other topics. But what was most impressive was the spirit, engagement and commitment that permeated the room for the two days of the meeting.

I would like to share with you some of what I learned during the preparation for that lecture, as well as some observations that tie together the impact and calls to action that are relevant to the Latino community and many other ethnic and socioeconomic groups in the United States. (You may wish to refer to the American Cancer Society's "Cancer Facts and Figures for Hispanics/Latinos 2012-2014" which contains a wealth of information relative to cancer for this community.) More...

Social Media And Cancer Awareness: Are We Smart Enough To Take Advantage Of The Opportunity?

by Dr. Len June 17, 2014

This past week I had the privilege of participating in a meeting hosted by the President's Cancer Panel on the role of social media in improving cancer control and treatment. The goal was to give advice to the Panel on a planned series of meetings they will be convening to discuss the topic. It was the range and quality of the discussion that day that left me thinking about the broader topic of social media and how it could help improve cancer control going forward. More...

Lung-MAP--A Bold Initiative To Find New Treatments For Squamous Cell Lung Cancer--Launches Today

by Dr. Len June 15, 2014

Today marks a major step forward in cancer clinical trials and drug development with the launch of the Lung-MAP protocol to evaluate new treatments for squamous cell lung cancer, a common cancer which has proven resistant to the standard drugs currently available. In response to this genuine unmet need, Lung-MAP has been designed to move new therapies more quickly from the laboratory to the bedside of patients afflicted with this serious disease and few options available.

Many--including present company--have written about the need to improve this process. We are in a new era of cancer drug development, spearheaded by our ever increasing knowledge of cancer genes and the targets within those genes that can be used to disrupt the cancer cell on its inexorable road to proliferation and destruction. Getting those drugs speedily through development and clinical testing has been a real challenge. And, going forward, finding the patients with the "right" genomic signature who are candidates to receive these therapies is going to be difficult. In simple terms, we need to find the patients where they live and match them to these new drugs as quickly as possible. And that hopefully will translate into more and better treatments for patients, and save lives. More...

ASCO 2014 Is A Wrap: If Immunotherapy Is The Queen Of The Ball, Then Panomics Holds The Keys To The Kingdom

by Dr. Len June 04, 2014

As in years past, the trip home from the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago gives me a moment to reflect on what I have heard and hopefully learned over the past five days.

This meeting is a whirlwind of activity and information, far too much for any one person to absorb and process. You can be focused on one topic, you can be general, and you can hear new cutting edge research or be educated on topics of general interest in cancer. You can go to the exhibit hall and be overwhelmed by the booths and displays (I tend not to go there, but obviously many others do). I suspect you get the idea.

Ultimately for me it is the take away messages about trends in cancer research and cancer care that matter the most personally. And this year the trends appear to be somewhat similar to past years, with perhaps some new wrinkles. What is undeniable is that if immunotherapy is the queen at the ball, then "panomics" (I really like that word) holds the keys to the kingdom. More...

The Picture With The Smile That Says So Much About Advances In Cancer Care

by Dr. Len June 04, 2014

It was the picture (see below) that, to me, said it all: a 96 year old woman -- one of the first patients in the world to receive a brand new cancer drug--, and a large tumor on her neck had melted completely away. But it was the smile on her lips that you couldn't avoid noticing. More...

Big Steps Forward In Melanoma Treatment But Tread Carefully

by Dr. Len June 02, 2014

The brave new world of melanoma treatment continues at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago. And notwithstanding the excitement, there are some other pieces of information around the edges that remind us once again that a breakthrough today may not be quite as promising when viewed a couple of years from now. More...

About Dr. Len

Dr. Len

J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD, MACP - Dr. Lichtenfeld is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for the national office of the American Cancer Society.

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