Dr. Len's Cancer Blog

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Dr. Len's Cancer Blog

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Big Steps Forward In Melanoma Treatment But Tread Carefully

by Dr. Len June 02, 2014

The brave new world of melanoma treatment continues at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology in Chicago. And notwithstanding the excitement, there are some other pieces of information around the edges that remind us once again that a breakthrough today may not be quite as promising when viewed a couple of years from now. More...

In An Era Of Bold New Cancer Treatments An Older Drug Shows Real Promise For Advanced Prostate Cancer

by Dr. Len June 02, 2014

The annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology here in Chicago is a place where many commercial interests jostle for attention to make their latest promising therapy the star of the show. But this weekend, a standard widely available generic drug stole the show by producing incredible results in improving survival for men with advanced prostate cancer. And that has some of us asking, "Why did it take so long to find out? More...

From The ASCO Meeting In Chicago: A Focus On Cost, Value, And Financial Toxicity Of Cancer Care

by Dr. Len May 31, 2014

At the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) here in Chicago, something vitally important is happening: there is an increasing recognition of something no one really wanted to talk about in polite company until now. It is the fact that the costs of many of the new treatments being developed are extraordinary.

The headlines about cost and value of cancer care greeted me when I walked into the McCormick Center in Chicago for the opening sessions of the meeting. This is the leading cancer meeting in the world, and what happens here makes news worldwide, significantly impacting the lives of patients with cancer wherever they may be.

Now there is an increasing recognition of the elephant in the room: the costs of these new treatments are extraordinary. No matter how one chooses to slice and dice the arguments, these drugs are expensive with costs per month of $8000 and upwards getting a lot of attention and increasing concerns, especially at this meeting. More...

The FDA Lays Down The Law About The Dangers Of Indoor Tanning

by Dr. Len May 29, 2014

In what has to be considered a major victory for those concerned about the proliferating use and risks of tanning beds, the Food and Drug Administration this week issued a final rule requiring devices used for indoor tanning to meet very specific requirements before they can be marketed to the public. And in what is probably an even more important part of the rule, they now instruct those who market tanning devices to consumers to warn them clearly about the very real and serious risks of indoor tanning. More...

We Need A Sense Of Urgency To Assure The Safety Of Health Information Technology

by Dr. Len May 16, 2014

This was the dream: we would use technology to create a seamless healthcare system, one where people, computers and machines would work together to improve patient care in many different ways. Health care would be more efficient, it would be safer, it would be less expensive, we would be able to transfer health-related information quickly and accurately.

After spending three days at a meeting this past week with some of the top experts in the field, I am not so certain that the dream is going to come true anytime soon. Perhaps more concerning, the problems--including patient safety issues--that are cropping up in so many areas are very troubling. More...

The Haunting Memories When Screening Doesn't Work

by Dr. Len March 27, 2014

I had the opportunity earlier this week to participate in a Twitter chat on the topic of colorectal cancer awareness. The chat was intended to bring attention to a nationwide campaign called "80 by 2018" designed to increase colorectal cancer screening rates to 80% of the population over the next 4 years. If it is successful, we should see a decline in both incidence and deaths from this disease.

But I am haunted by two of the comments I tweeted during the session chat that won't leave my conscience:

"As a doc, you don't forget the patients you couldn't help. And you celebrate those you did. #CRCawareness is key #80by2018"

"Let's remember that screening doesn't help everyone, so don't forget the need for more research in understanding #CRC #80by2018"

While we celebrate the opportunity to save more lives with screening, we cannot ignore or forget those for whom screening for colorectal cancer (or other cancers, for that matter) couldn't or didn't make a difference. More...

Progress In Colorectal Cancer Not Shared By Everyone

by Dr. Len March 19, 2014

An article published this week in the American Cancer Society journal CA: A Journal for Clinicians received a lot of media attention. The report showed dramatic declines in the rate of people being diagnosed with colorectal cancer, as well as decreases in the rates of colorectal cancer deaths over the past number of years.

But the press didn't say much about the fact that not everyone has benefitted from the progress we have made in the prevention, early detection, and improved treatment for colorectal cancer. It is a sad but very real commentary on how we approach health care in this country that African Americans have not benefitted equally from this progress in treating a cancer that for many people can be prevented or effectively treated when found before it spreads to other parts of the body.

As a nation, I believe it is incumbent that we address this glaring health disparity. To do less is unacceptable. More...

It Helps To Know What Watchful Waiting Really Means In Prostate Cancer Treatment

by Dr. Len March 06, 2014

News reports covering a prostate cancer study this week in the New England Journal of Medicine have all pretty much come out with the same message: men diagnosed with prostate cancer who had radical surgery did much better than men who were assigned to "watchful waiting" after they were diagnosed.

But guess what? There's a critical fact that seemed to be missing in much of the coverage I saw. And that fact is this: the men who were given the "watchful waiting" as described in the study never received any curative treatment. Let me repeat: No curative treatment. That is a much different approach to watchful waiting than we currently recommend in the United States, where watchful waiting after a diagnosis of prostate cancer usually means offering curative treatment when the prostate cancer changes its behavior. More...

One Doctor's Confession: Basal And Squamous Cell Skin Cancers Are NOT Benign

by Dr. Len January 07, 2014

I have made a resolution for 2014: I will never, never, never again call basal and squamous skin cancers "benign" cancers.

Why would I make such a strange commitment? The explanation is simple:  I spent 4 hours on New Year's Eve sitting in the surgeon's chair getting a skin cancer taken off my nose. Nothing about the experience fits the "benign" label so many professionals, including yours truly, have used:  routine; easy to treat; nothing to worry about.  Friends, after this experience, which left me looking like a tall, white-haired Rudolph the Reindeer, I am here to tell you these cancers are not to be trifled with, and are worth every effort you can make at preventing them by reducing exposure to UV radiation. More...

The Flu Is One Gift That We Don't Have To Keep On Giving For People With Cancer

by Dr. Len December 17, 2013

 

It's the holiday season, a time of reflection, celebration and for many, giving gifts. But there is at least one gift that no one wants to get, and certainly no one wants to give: the flu. And for people with cancer, and those they come in contact with, the flu can be a very serious event. For that reason and many more, people more than 6 months old-and especially those in contact with people who have serious illnesses like cancer-should get vaccinated against the flu.

Too many of us think the flu is a minor inconvenience. But that is almost certainly because we confuse the typical cold or upper respiratory infection, which usually means discomfort and maybe a day or two off work.  Influenza is a much different and much more dangerous animal, especially to people with chronic diseases.

Over time we have become somewhat immune to the messages about the dangers of the flu, now that we have vaccinations and medicines which can treat the illness. Few are alive who remember anything about the great influenza pandemic of 1918:

"The influenza of that season, however was far more than a cold...The flu was most deadly for people ages 20-40...It infected 28% of all Americans (Tice). An estimated 675,000 Americans died of influence during the pandemic, ten times as many as in the world war. Of the US soldiers who died in Europe, half of them fell to the influenza virus and not the enemy (Deseret News) An estimated 43,000 servicemen mobilized for WWI died of influenza (Crosby)."

We have been fortunate not to have a repeat of that pandemic. But for some of us, the flu remains a deadly possibility, one that we might be able to prevent if we take the precaution of getting a flu shot.

People with cancer are among the groups at especially high risk of getting the complications of flu. And also let's not ignore the "risk pool" of people who live with patients with cancer and those who care for people with cancer. We tend to forget that those healthier folks who help people with serious illnesses can be the transmitters of this potentially serious and life-threatening infection.

Because of those risks, people with cancer and those they come in contact with really need to understand their options about getting vaccinated against the flu, and-assuming they don't have specific contraindications to the vaccine-if at all possible get it done. It is still not too late to get this year's flu vaccination. No one can predict when the vaccine "season" will peak or how serious it will be in any given year. But waiting until the last minute, when the story is all over the news, is not a good idea and it's not good medicine. And worse, it doesn't work. More...

About Dr. Len

Dr. Len

J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD, MACP - Dr. Lichtenfeld is Deputy Chief Medical Officer for the national office of the American Cancer Society.

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