Cancer - Unknown Primary

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After Treatment TOPICS

Other things to consider

How about your emotional health?

During cancer treatment, you may find yourself overwhelmed by emotions. This happens to a lot of people. You may find that you think about the potential of your own death, or the effect of your cancer on your family, friends, and career.

This is an ideal time to seek out emotional and social support. You need people you can turn to for strength and comfort. Support can come in many forms: family, friends, cancer support groups, church or spiritual groups, online support communities, or individual counselors.

Almost everyone who has been through cancer can benefit from getting some type of support. What’s best for you depends on your situation and personality. Some people feel safe in peer-support groups or education groups. Others would rather talk in an informal setting, such as church. Others may feel more at ease talking one-on-one with a trusted friend or counselor. Whatever your source of strength or comfort, make sure you have a place to go with your concerns.

The cancer journey can feel very lonely. It’s not necessary or realistic to go it all by yourself. And your friends and family may feel shut out if you decide not include them. Let them in – and let in anyone else who you feel may help. If you aren’t sure who can help, call your American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345 and we can put you in touch with an appropriate group or resource.

You can’t change the fact that you have cancer. What you can change is how you live the rest of your life – making healthy choices and feeling as well as possible, physically and emotionally.


Last Medical Review: 03/12/2013
Last Revised: 01/31/2014