EXPERT VOICES

Timely insight on cancer topics from the experts of the American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society Expert Voices

The American Cancer Society

Cancer Survivors: Make Changes for Long-term Health Gains

May 28, 2013

By Corinne Leach, MPH, MS, PhD

If you are a cancer survivor, whether you're currently in treatment or completed treatment long ago, you are far from alone. The estimated number of cancer survivors in the United States is currently 13.7 million and will continue to grow as our population gets older. By 2022, we expect there to be 18 million cancer survivors.

Cancer researchers are working hard to find cancers earlier, improve treatment, and decrease the negative side effects commonly associated with treatment, like fatigue, pain, lymphedema, and chemo brain. Many people come into the cancer experience with other chronic health conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension, arthritis), and many more develop additional conditions after their cancer treatment ends.

An important question is:  what can I do to stay as healthy as possible and feel as good as I can after cancer? The good news is that making changes in your lifestyle can make a difference in your long-term health. Here at the American Cancer Society we recently developed physical activity and healthy eating recommendations specifically for cancer survivors. But what do they mean for you? More...

Filed Under:

Survivorship

Can breastfeeding lower breast cancer risk?

May 07, 2013

By Debbie Saslow, PhD


There are a limited number of things that women can do to lower their risk of breast cancer, including getting regular physical activity, limiting alcohol, and maintaining a healthy weight. Breastfeeding has often been included in the protective behaviors against breast cancer, but the research has been inconsistent.

Looking at the research on breastfeeding and breast cancer risk, it is clear that this has been a difficult area to study. If breastfeeding does lower risk, the level of protection is small and depends on women breastfeeding for a long time.  In countries such as the U.S., most women who breastfeed their babies stop after several months, or they breastfeed less frequently as they start to supplement with formula and baby food. Women who have many children and breastfeed each baby for a long time seem to be at somewhat lower risk of breast cancer than women who have smaller families and breastfeed for a shorter time. Studies that have found that breastfeeding does lower breast cancer risk have also found that protection builds up over time (that is, duration of breastfeeding) and number of children that are breastfed.

The major study (Collaborative Group on Hormonal Factors in Breast Cancer; Lancet, 2002 Jul 20; 360 (9328): 187-95) that supports breastfeeding as protective against breast cancer was published in 2002. The researchers analyzed 47 studies in 30 countries; these studies had information about 50,000 women with invasive breast cancers and 97,000 women without breast cancer.  The study authors found that the rate of breast cancer diagnoses was slightly lower among women who had breastfed and among women who had breastfed for longer periods of time. More...

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Breast Cancer | Debbie Saslow

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