EXPERT VOICES

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The American Cancer Society

The HPV vaccine could do even more

January 23, 2014

EDITOR'S NOTE: The President's Cancer Panel has released a report that says increasing HPV vaccination is one of the most important opportunities in cancer prevention. The report calls for re-energized efforts to promote vaccination and reach the HPV vaccines' potential to save lives by preventing avoidable cancers in men and women. It explores underuse of HPV vaccines, identifies key barriers to increasing vaccine uptake, and provides actionable recommendations for overcoming these obstacles. To coincide with the release, here is our recent blog on the subject.

 

By Debbie Saslow, PhD

The HPV vaccines (Gardasil and Cervarix) have been recommended for girls in the US for nearly 10 years. They protect against human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes most cases of cervical cancer, and Gardasil also protects against nearly all cases of genital warts. Uptake of HPV vaccination has been slow in this country, though; less than 35% of girls have gotten all 3 recommended doses.

Despite low vaccination rates, we have already seen HPV infections (related to the types of HPV targeted by the vaccines) drop by 56% in the United States. In countries that have higher vaccine rates, there are even larger drops. Indeed, data published last year suggest that higher vaccination rates could reap great benefits.

The potential to eliminate genital warts

 

A study from Australia, where more than 70% of adolescent girls are vaccinated, suggests that in countries where vaccine coverage is high, genital warts may be eliminated in the coming decades.

The government-funded Australian HPV vaccine program has provided free vaccine in schools to 12- and 13-year-old girls since 2007. From 2007-2010, free vaccine was also offered to girls and women ages 14-26.

The number of cases of genital warts among young people has dropped dramatically since the program began. More...

The Landmark Surgeon General Report on Smoking and Health, 50 Years Later

January 15, 2014

By Richard C. Wender, MD

 

Fifty years ago, on January 11, 1964, Luther Terry held a press conference to announce the results of the first Surgeon General's report on smoking and health, the most impactful public health document in history. The report laid to rest over a decade of debate about the health risks of smoking by definitively stating that smoking causes lung and laryngeal cancer in men, chronic bronchitis, and other diseases.

Research conducted by the American Cancer Society and other groups had already demonstrated the adverse health effects of smoking, but, until the Surgeon General's report, the tobacco industry had been successful in hiding the truth. The extraordinary methods used by the Surgeon General to ensure that the report was completely unbiased -- including allowing the tobacco industry to veto nominees to serve on the panel -- the thoroughness of the research, and the clarity of the conclusions, all led to one outcome: the end of the debate about the health risks of smoking and the launch of the true fight to end the use of tobacco products. The progress in the tobacco fight over the past 50 years represents one of the most successful, life-saving public health campaigns in our nation's history.

Learn more about the 50th anniversary of the Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health:

The Hammond/Horn study

The effects of tobacco control

Rates Drop for New Lung Cancer Cases in the US

Tobacco and Cancer

Guide to Quitting Smoking

 

The public health victories, and the challenges



Forty-three percent of Americans smoked prior to the Surgeon General's report; 18% smoke today. Smoking in airplanes, restaurants, and places of employment has largely disappeared.  We're now fully aware of the addictive nature of the nicotine in tobacco products, and the importance of preventing and treating that addiction. Tobacco executives were eventually forced to admit, before Congress and the country, that they were long aware of the addictive nature of their products as well as the harmful health effects. 

We've learned that raising the cost of a pack of cigarettes is the single most effective way to reduce the number of people who start using tobacco products and the most effective way to promote quitting. Tobacco tax increases have been implemented in many states.  As of 2009, the FDA was granted the authority to regulate tobacco products, although the tobacco industry has placed substantial roadblocks in the path of effective FDA action. The United States is not alone. Smoking rates in most high-resource ("Western") nations like England, Canada, and Australia have substantially declined, comparable to the progress that we've seen.  We've witnessed 50 years of amazing progress; we truly do have much to celebrate.  

And much to lament. More...

Filed Under:

Tobacco/Smoking

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