EXPERT VOICES

Timely insight on cancer topics from the experts of the American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society Expert Voices

The American Cancer Society

Indoors or outdoors, there's no such thing as a safe tan

May 22, 2014

By Gery P. Guy Jr., PhD, MPH


If you read no further, know this: there is no such thing as a safe tan. Indoor tanning is just as dangerous, if not more, than tanning outside in the sun. In fact, indoor tanning injures thousands of people each year badly enough to go to the emergency department. Indoor tanning can cause sunburn and damage to your eyes that could lead to vision loss. Indoor tanning can also cause premature skin aging, including loss of elasticity, wrinkling, age spots, and changes in skin texture.

Most dangerous of all, indoor tanning is a recognized cause of skin cancer, including deadly melanoma. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Approximately 3.5 million cases of non-melanoma skin cancers are treated each year, and more than 70,000 melanomas are diagnosed yearly. While many cancers have been on the decline in recent years, rates of melanoma, which causes the most skin cancer-related deaths, have been on the rise. Increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV) through indoor tanning may be partially responsible for the continued increase in melanoma, especially among young women. Indoor tanning is particularly dangerous for younger and more frequent users.

Tanning myths


There are a lot of misconceptions about indoor tanning, so it's important to know the following:

  • Tanned skin is not healthy skin. That "healthy glow" from the tanning bed indicates damage to your skin. Whether tanning or burning, you are exposing yourself to harmful UV rays. In fact, every time you engage in indoor tanning, you increase your risk of melanoma. The truly healthy glow is your natural skin color. More...

Cell Phones, Bras, and Breast Cancer Risk

May 13, 2014

By Ted Gansler, MD, MPH

 

Like other contributors to the Expert Voices blogs, I am occasionally asked to reply to questions from journalists about various cancer-related topics. The most recent question I received is whether it is true that women who carry a cell phone in their bras are at increased risk for developing breast cancer.

This kind of question is surprisingly difficult to answer. It's relatively easy to write about things that are known to cause cancer. It's more difficult to be confident that something does not cause cancer, but one can still provide some guidance if there have been at least a few carefully-conducted epidemiologic studies with negative results. The most challenging requests we receive are often about questions that researchers have not addressed by scientific studies of humans populations. This is one such question.

Cause or Coincidence?


There are a few known instances of breast cancer in young women who have kept cell phones in their bras. (Even when cell phones are not being used for conversation or texting, if they are on then they still periodically emit low energy electromagnetic signals to stay in touch with nearby cell towers.) Because breast cancer is an uncommon and tragic occurrence among young women, these cases have received significant attention on television and on the Internet. But it is the nature of these media to emphasize unusual events, so of course we don't hear much about the millions of women and men who carry phones close to various organs and still remain healthy. More...

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