EXPERT VOICES

Timely insight on cancer topics from the experts of the American Cancer Society

American Cancer Society Expert Voices

The American Cancer Society

Prevention & Early Detection (31 posts)  RSS

Indoors or outdoors, there's no such thing as a safe tan

May 22, 2014

By Gery P. Guy Jr., PhD, MPH


If you read no further, know this: there is no such thing as a safe tan. Indoor tanning is just as dangerous, if not more, than tanning outside in the sun. In fact, indoor tanning injures thousands of people each year badly enough to go to the emergency department. Indoor tanning can cause sunburn and damage to your eyes that could lead to vision loss. Indoor tanning can also cause premature skin aging, including loss of elasticity, wrinkling, age spots, and changes in skin texture.

Most dangerous of all, indoor tanning is a recognized cause of skin cancer, including deadly melanoma. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. Approximately 3.5 million cases of non-melanoma skin cancers are treated each year, and more than 70,000 melanomas are diagnosed yearly. While many cancers have been on the decline in recent years, rates of melanoma, which causes the most skin cancer-related deaths, have been on the rise. Increased exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV) through indoor tanning may be partially responsible for the continued increase in melanoma, especially among young women. Indoor tanning is particularly dangerous for younger and more frequent users.

Tanning myths


There are a lot of misconceptions about indoor tanning, so it's important to know the following:

  • Tanned skin is not healthy skin. That "healthy glow" from the tanning bed indicates damage to your skin. Whether tanning or burning, you are exposing yourself to harmful UV rays. In fact, every time you engage in indoor tanning, you increase your risk of melanoma. The truly healthy glow is your natural skin color. More...

A national effort to help end colon cancer

March 12, 2014

By Richard C. Wender, MD

About a year ago, U.S. Assistant Secretary for Health Howard Koh, MD, invited a small group of people to his office to discuss the opportunity for the nation to start a full court press to end colorectal (colon) cancer as a major public health problem in the United States. The meeting idea came from a conversation on his back porch with his college friend Ron Vender, MD, who had just been elected President of the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG). Howard asked Ron how he could most effectively work with the ACG and, together, they decided that it was the right time to tackle colon cancer in a big way.

Dr. Koh invited leaders of the organizations that were at the center of public health efforts to increase colon cancer screening rates to attend the meeting. Screening is looking for cancer in people who have no symptoms of the disease. In the case of colon cancer, screening can find the disease at an early, more treatable stage, and it can also prevent it altogether. This is because colon cancer screening tests often find polyps, which can then be removed before they have a chance to become cancerous.

Leaders from the American Cancer Society and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were joined by leaders of several other vital governmental agencies, gastroenterologist organizations, and the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT). The NCCRT is an organization co-founded 17 years ago by the American Cancer Society and CDC. Today, the NCCRT brings together close to 80 organizations with a single common goal: to increase colon cancer screening rates, our most effective way to fight the disease. The key to the NCCRT's success has been its commitment to joining diverse organizations as equal stakeholders, to do the kind of work that no one organization can accomplish alone. It's a great example of public health in action. More...

The HPV vaccine could do even more

January 23, 2014

EDITOR'S NOTE: The President's Cancer Panel has released a report that says increasing HPV vaccination is one of the most important opportunities in cancer prevention. The report calls for re-energized efforts to promote vaccination and reach the HPV vaccines' potential to save lives by preventing avoidable cancers in men and women. It explores underuse of HPV vaccines, identifies key barriers to increasing vaccine uptake, and provides actionable recommendations for overcoming these obstacles. To coincide with the release, here is our recent blog on the subject.

 

By Debbie Saslow, PhD

The HPV vaccines (Gardasil and Cervarix) have been recommended for girls in the US for nearly 10 years. They protect against human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes most cases of cervical cancer, and Gardasil also protects against nearly all cases of genital warts. Uptake of HPV vaccination has been slow in this country, though; less than 35% of girls have gotten all 3 recommended doses.

Despite low vaccination rates, we have already seen HPV infections (related to the types of HPV targeted by the vaccines) drop by 56% in the United States. In countries that have higher vaccine rates, there are even larger drops. Indeed, data published last year suggest that higher vaccination rates could reap great benefits.

The potential to eliminate genital warts

 

A study from Australia, where more than 70% of adolescent girls are vaccinated, suggests that in countries where vaccine coverage is high, genital warts may be eliminated in the coming decades.

The government-funded Australian HPV vaccine program has provided free vaccine in schools to 12- and 13-year-old girls since 2007. From 2007-2010, free vaccine was also offered to girls and women ages 14-26.

The number of cases of genital warts among young people has dropped dramatically since the program began. More...

Should women at high risk for breast cancer take drugs to prevent it?

October 14, 2013

By James C. Salwitz, MD


Breast cancer will kill more than 450,000 women worldwide this year, and in the United States alone, 232,000 will be newly diagnosed. Two important recent events shift the conversation from disease treatment to prevention. The most public was the stunning statement of actress Angelina Jolie that she had both her breasts removed because she carried a breast cancer gene (BRCA1). This announcement served to greatly increase awareness and discussion of choice in preventing the disease. 

Second, was the decision by the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) to recommend the use of medications for prevention of breast cancer in women who are at increased risk.

Many factors influence breast cancer risk


In order to prevent breast cancer, we must first understand its causes. While we do not know all, we do understand that certain factors increase the chance of getting breast cancer. Some of these risk factors can be reduced through improved lifestyle, but not all.

Most breast cancer occurs not because of known genetic mutations, but because of a combination of risk factors. One important risk factor is increasing age, with most breast cancers occurring in women 55 years of age and older.

Some risk factors include an early age for a first period (start of menses), a late first pregnancy, and no pregnancy at all. Breast-feeding decreases cancer rates. Prescription estrogen replacement, especially after menopause, increases breast cancer risk. The more alcohol a woman drinks, starting even with small amounts, the higher her chance of getting the disease. Obesity and low amounts of exercise increase the chance of developing breast cancer, too.

If a woman has increased breast density on mammogram, this increases the chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer. If a woman has any breast biopsies, particularly if the biopsies showed benign growth of the lining of milk ducts ("proliferation"), this increases risk. Certain benign duct changes, such as hyperplasia or atypia, greatly increase risk. Also, ductal or lobular carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS and LCIS) greatly increase the chance of developing invasive breast cancer.

Finally, family history, even without a defined cancer gene like BRCA1 or BRCA2, increases the likelihood a woman will get breast cancer. Each first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has breast cancer increases further the chance of breast cancer. The younger the breast cancer occurred, the greater the risk to the patient. More...

New cancer genes: should I run to be tested?

August 07, 2013

By Mia M. Gaudet, PhD


Scientists have long cautioned that a family history of cancer increases your personal risk of cancer. Some genetic changes (mutations) that are found in only a few families but tremendously increase risk of cancer (e.g., BRCA1/2) have been known since the 1990s.  These mutations are already used by doctors to identify high risk men and women. However, there is still much of the genetic component of cancer that is unknown. Advances in genetics and technology now allow scientists to look at common changes in the genetic code to see if these changes are related to risk of cancer. 

Researchers are trying to answer these questions. Recently, an international group of cancer investigators linked 74 genetic regions to cancer. These newly identified genetic regions contain common changes in their code (called polymorphisms) that have only small effects on the risk of cancer. But when you combine many polymorphisms, that risk increases.

These new polymorphisms were found by studying the genetic make-up of more than 200,000 people. Women with and without breast cancer, women who had mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2, women with and without ovarian cancer, and men with and without prostate cancer participated in the studies. More...

The obesity-cancer connection, and what we can do about it

February 28, 2013

By Lewis E. Foxhall, MD

It's almost impossible to get through the holiday season without gaining a few pounds, and for many of us that means we are even more likely to be over our ideal body weight.  Sure, we all want to look good in our clothes, but being obese is not just a condition that affects our appearance.  And in March, during National Nutrition Month, it's a good chance to talk about it.

Weight gain happens when we take in more calories from food (energy) than we use up through our basic biological requirements and exercise. After a while, enough fat stores up and makes us obese. Our bodies are very efficient at taking in energy and storing it for times when it is hard to find, but in our modern environment this is working against us and our health.  For most of us it is easy to get as much food as we want, and most of us do not need to exert ourselves much for work or daily living activities.


Link between obesity and cancer


The problem with being overweight or obese, as measured by weight and height, is that it raises our risk of chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.  But did you know that being obese can actually increase our risk of getting cancer and may even worsen our chances of surviving after a cancer diagnosis?  In fact, the American Cancer Society Cancer Prevention Study II showed significant increases in cancer occurrence in people who are the most overweight.  This link is stronger in some cancer types --including breast cancer after menopause, and cancers of the colon and rectum, pancreas, kidney, esophagus, and endometrium -- and can be associated with a major increase in risk. More...

Does Being Overweight Cause Breast Cancer?

October 11, 2012

The Relationship between Weight and Breast Cancer

By Lauren Teras, PhD

 

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women today. More than 1 million women world-wide are diagnosed with this cancer each year, mostly in the 50 and older age group.  Breast Cancer Awareness Month highlights this international public health problem, and it is a good time to consider ways in which we can reduce our risk of this cancer.  While many factors beyond our control contribute to risk, like age and family history, we do know of a few ways we can lower the risk of breast cancer.


Worldwide obesity has more than doubled since 1980. Once considered a problem only in high income countries, being overweight and obese is now dramatically on the rise all over the world, particularly in urban areas. As of 2008, the World Health Organization estimated that 1.4 billion adults were overweight, including 300 million obese individuals.  In the year 2000, for the first time in human history, the number of adults worldwide who were overweight was greater than the number of adults who were underweight. In fact, approximately 65% of the world's population lives in countries where being overweight and obese kills more people than being underweight. The U.S. is near the front of the pack as the country with the 4th highest rate of obesity; about 2/3 of people in America are overweight, including approximately 1/3 are obese. More...

Can Removing Fallopian Tubes Prevent Cancer ?

August 28, 2012

By Debbie Saslow, PhD

 

I've seen a few articles recently about removing the fallopian tubes to prevent ovarian cancer, a procedure called "prophylactic bilateral salpingectomy". And not just in women who are at high risk for ovarian cancer, which is already recommended by gynecological medical societies in the United States, but for all women who are not planning to have any more children and who are about to undergo abdominal surgery for any reason.


I can see the appeal given that many, if not most, ovarian cancers actually originate in the fallopian tubes. In fact, it is more common to find microscopic fallopian tube cancer than microscopic ovarian cancer in women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation when they have their ovaries and fallopian tubes removed. (These mutations put them at higher risk for ovarian and breast cancer.) And unfortunately we don't yet have an accurate test to screen women for ovarian cancer, so these cancers are usually found at a late stage when they are often fatal. 


It is common for women to get their "tubes tied" (i.e. tubal ligation) as a form of permanent birth control, and we know this reduces the risk of ovarian cancer. But removing the fallopian tubes is a more invasive procedure, and the potential benefits and potential harms are largely unknown. Is it worth it? Does it really reduce the risk of ovarian cancer and, if so, by how much? More...

Expert Voices blog: Cancer Vaccines -- Fulfilling the Promise

June 26, 2012

By William H. Chambers, PhD

 

Vaccines are not new. In fact, there is evidence that the ancient Egyptians and Chinese used them many centuries ago.  Vaccines work by preparing your own immune system to attack invading pathogens, thus preventing disease. Vaccines have helped us make great inroads against many deadly diseases over the past 60 years, when they became used more widely.


Using vaccines against cancer is relatively new, though. Cancer researchers have been trying to make vaccines for tumors, just like others have made vaccines for measles, mumps, and tetanus. More...

What we can learn from the Cancer Prevention Studies

May 15, 2012

By Alpa Patel, PhD


How often do you see someone battling cancer and wish there was something tangible you could do to make a difference?

 

During the past 50 years, more than 2 million volunteer participants have joined the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Studies and have been making a difference simply by giving a little time to fill out surveys and share information about their behaviors, lifestyle, family and personal medical history, and other information. In 1959 and 1982, adult men and women voluntarily joined the Cancer Prevention Studies I, and II, respectively. Their simple actions as study participants have helped us understand much of what we know about how cancer develops in the population.

 

Today, a new generation can do the same, by joining the Cancer Prevention Study-3 (CPS-3), the Society's newest Cancer Prevention Study. More...

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