EXPERT VOICES

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The American Cancer Society

Survivorship (17 posts)  RSS

How electronic health records can help on your cancer journey

August 20, 2014

By Simone Myrie

Ed. note: This guest post by Simone Myrie of the Office of Consumer eHealth, Office of the National Coordinator (ONC) for Health Information technology, US Department of Health and Human Services. In it, she explains how electronic health records and Blue Button can help cancer patients, survivors, and caregivers as they navigate their cancer journey.


No two experiences with cancer are alike, but there are certain things that almost all cancer patients and their loved ones share in common. From getting a diagnosis, to coordinating care among doctors and at home, and on to long-term survivorship plans, the cancer experience is one centered around information. Some of the information we seek is mostly objective: What can I expect this disease to do? What are my treatment options? How can I improve my odds of beating cancer?

But some of the most important information you can gather, keep track of and share is information unique to you: Your own health records. The visit summaries, clinical notes, test results, medication lists, treatment histories, and other documents represent a critical picture of your individual cancer experience. This information has implications for your individual choices, your professional care, and the care you receive from loved ones. More...

Filed Under:

General | Survivorship

Cancer Survivors: Make Changes for Long-term Health Gains

May 28, 2013

By Corinne Leach, MPH, MS, PhD

If you are a cancer survivor, whether you're currently in treatment or completed treatment long ago, you are far from alone. The estimated number of cancer survivors in the United States is currently 13.7 million and will continue to grow as our population gets older. By 2022, we expect there to be 18 million cancer survivors.

Cancer researchers are working hard to find cancers earlier, improve treatment, and decrease the negative side effects commonly associated with treatment, like fatigue, pain, lymphedema, and chemo brain. Many people come into the cancer experience with other chronic health conditions (e.g., diabetes, hypertension, arthritis), and many more develop additional conditions after their cancer treatment ends.

An important question is:  what can I do to stay as healthy as possible and feel as good as I can after cancer? The good news is that making changes in your lifestyle can make a difference in your long-term health. Here at the American Cancer Society we recently developed physical activity and healthy eating recommendations specifically for cancer survivors. But what do they mean for you? More...

Filed Under:

Survivorship

Holiday Eating Tips If You're in Cancer Treatment

December 03, 2012

By Michele Szafranski, MS, RD, CSO, LDN

 

We all have wonderful food memories associated with the holidays. Maybe it is a favorite dish made by a loved one or a special memory of decorating cookies with your grandchildren. But during cancer treatment, visions of sugar plums may bring anxiety. When you are having trouble eating or keeping food down, the thought of holiday gatherings and meals can fill you with dread. There are a few things to keep in mind that might be help you get through these occasions with reduced stress.


Celebrating doesn't have to be stressful

What can you do to make a holiday gathering less stressful? First, don't be afraid to tell people you aren't up to your usual celebration. Delegate if you are hosting the party. People always want to know what they can do, so give them specific dishes or tasks to take some of the pressure off.  If you have a dish you are known for, focus your energy on that one dish and let others take care of the rest. If you aren't up to cooking, pass the beloved recipe to a friend or loved one for them to try.  Offer to bring drinks, paper goods, or the centerpiece for the holiday table. To avoid the hassle of a big entrance, arrive early and find a quiet spot to sit if you need to escape from the hustle and bustle of the kitchen.

When it comes to the food, here are tips to help you find what and how much you can eat: More...

Filed Under:

Caregiving | Survivorship

Weight Gain during Cancer Treatment

July 05, 2012

By Michele Szfranski, MS, RD, CSO, LDN

 

When I talk with people who have gained weight during their cancer treatment, they are often shocked. For people who lost considerable weight before their diagnosis and then felt better once their treatment started, weight gain can be a welcome change. But more often I speak with people who were at a healthy weight or overweight before treatment and did not realize that their treatment might cause some weight gain. More...

Filed Under:

Survivorship

ACS releases new data on survivorship

June 14, 2012

By Kevin Stein, PhD

 

June is turning out to be big month for cancer survivors. Not only did we celebrate National Cancer Survivor Day on the 7th, but the Society is also co-hosting the 6th Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference June 14 -16 in Arlington, VA.

 

And the American Cancer Society has just released the first-ever Cancer Treatment and Survivorship Facts & Figures, the newest addition to our Facts & Figures publications. The report highlights the continued increase in numbers of cancer survivors in the United States. Survivors are defined as any person with cancer from the time of diagnosis on.

 

We estimate that there are now 13.7 million Americans alive today who have a history of cancer, and that this number is expected to grow to nearly 18 million by 2022. More...

Filed Under:

Breaking News | Survivorship

Just say no -- to pain drugs?

May 07, 2012

By Terri Ades, DNP, FNP-BC, AOCN

 

We remember the phrase from the 1980s. It emerged from a substance abuse prevention program to teach students skills to resist peer pressure and other social influences. When Mrs. Nancy Reagan was visiting an elementary school in California and was asked by a schoolgirl what to do if she was offered drugs, the first lady responded by saying, "Just say no."  Upon her husband's election to the presidency, Mrs. Reagan outlined how she wished to help educate the youth, stating that her best role would be to bring awareness about the dangers of drug abuse.


Mrs. Reagan was talking about drug abuse among our youth- she was not talking about the appropriate use of drugs to treat cancer-related pain. Yet patients are hesitant today to take pain-relieving medicines for their pain, and caregivers are reluctant to give them. Many are afraid of addiction. Are their fears related to this campaign from the 1980s? Probably not, but we know it is very difficult to change people's attitudes about taking pain-relieving medicines once those attitudes are formed. More...

Filed Under:

Survivorship

New healthy living guidelines for cancer survivors

April 26, 2012

By Colleen Doyle, MS, RD


In my work at the American Cancer Society, when I talk with people who've been diagnosed with cancer, they tend to ask me 3 things: what can I do to reduce the chance that my cancer will come back? What can I do to help me not develop some other kind of cancer? How can I help my family members reduce their own risk for developing cancer?


For many years, answering questions 2 and 3 was a cinch.


We've known for years that for people who don't smoke, the most important ways to reduce their risk of cancer are to strive to be at a healthy weight, live a physically active lifestyle, eat a diet made up mostly of fruits, vegetables and whole grains, and watch how much alcohol is consumed (if any, at all).  As a matter of fact, a recent study published by ACS researchers showed that non-smokers who most closely followed those recommendations had a significantly lower risk of premature death from cancer, cardiovascular disease, and all causes when compared to people who followed the guidelines least closely.


So giving advice about how to reduce their risk of developing another type of cancer and providing information to pass on to their own family members was pretty easy, because that data has been around for many years.


Answers about how to reduce the risk of recurrence were not as clear. But they've recently gotten clearer. More...

Filed Under:

Colleen Doyle | Survivorship

Chemo Brain: It is Real

April 09, 2012

By Terri Ades, DNP, FNP-BC, AOCN

 

Recently a colleague at work who had just returned from a getting a haircut mentioned to me that his hairdresser, who has lung cancer, was upset because her husband was very worried about her. The hairdresser explained that she had started having some memory problems - couldn't remember what she did yesterday or couldn't remember people's names.  And she had started to tell her husband something and stopped in the middle of her story - not remembering what to say next.  She too acknowledged being a little concerned and was seeing her doctor in 3 days, but she didn't know how to help her husband until then.  I asked if she was receiving chemotherapy and was told yes, so I explained that she might have "chemo brain."  


We've known for some time that radiation therapy to the brain can cause problems with thinking and memory. Now, we are learning that chemotherapy is linked to some of the same kinds of problems. Research has shown that some chemotherapy agents can cause certain kinds of changes in the brain. Though the brain usually recovers over time, the sometimes vague yet distressing mental changes cancer patients notice are real, not imagined. These changes can make people unable to go back to their school, work, or social activities, or make it so that it takes a lot of mental effort to do so.  These changes affect everyday life for many people receiving cancer treatment. More...

Filed Under:

Survivorship | Terri Ades

The key to good care for cancer survivors

February 23, 2012

By Lewis Foxhall, MD

 

Every cancer patient wants to successfully complete active treatment .  Thanks to improved treatments and use of cancer screening programs (which can find cancer early, when it's most treatable), this goal is being reached more frequently than ever. 

 

But to get the most out of treatment there is more you can do.  A proactive approach to care for cancer survivors has developed over the last few years. This includes traditional follow up looking for any signs the original cancer has come back.  It also includes active management of any lingering side effects of treatment, testing for new cancers, and addressing psychological and social problems that may develop or persist after treatment.  This approach is intended to give you the greatest benefit from your treatment so you can live longer, and better. More...

Filed Under:

Survivorship

Weight Loss during Chemo

January 24, 2012

By Michele Szafranski, MS, RD, CSO, LDN

 

"Well, I could stand to lose some weight." As a cancer dietitian, I have heard this more times than I can count in the past 10 years. But most people are surprised when I explain to them that losing weight during their treatment may not be the best time. While getting to a healthy weight over the long run can be a healthy thing to do,  it can actually be harmful before and during cancer treatment.


For some people with cancer, keeping weight stable can feel like an uphill battle since there are many factors that can contribute to weight loss even before patients are diagnosed. For instance, the cancer itself may produce chemicals called "cytokines" that can give you less of an appetite or cause nausea. Or the location of a tumor may place pressure on the digestive tract, making you fill up on food easily or have a hard time swallowing. After receiving a diagnosis, anxiety about the diagnosis and upcoming treatment can take away appetite. Then once treatment begins, side effects such as nausea, diarrhea, taste changes, and sore throat can change what and how much people are eating. More...

Filed Under:

Survivorship

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