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Recent Colorectal Cancer Risk and Screening Articles

Screening increases the odds that colorectal cancers will be found at a localized stage, when the 5-year survival rate is 90%, and reduces the number of cases found with distant spread, when only 10% of patients survive 5 years after diagnosis. Furthermore, screening can identify polyps, which if removed can prevent colorectal cancer from developing. If all adults 50 and older were screened for colon cancer, we could cut the death rate from this disease in half—saving approximately 25,000 lives per year.

Read the articles below for updates on new methods and procedures for colorectal screening and more detailed information on risk factors.


Screening Science

Accuracy of Fecal Immunochemical Tests for Colorectal Cancer. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis – Annals of Internal Medicine 2014

Long-Term Mortality after Screening for Colorectal Cancer – New England Journal of Medicine 2013

Colonoscopic Polypectomy and Long-Term Prevention of Colorectal-Cancer Deaths – New England Journal of Medicine 2012

Accuracy of Screening for Fecal Occult Blood on a Single Stool Sample Obtained by Digital Rectal Examination: A Comparison with Recommended Sampling Practice – Annals of Internal Medicine 2005


Increasing Screening Rates

How to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates in Practice – CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2007
 

Screening Guidelines

Screening and Surveillance for the Early Detection of Colorectal Cancer and Adenomatous Polyps, 2008: A Joint Guideline from the American Cancer Society, the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer, and the American College of Radiology – CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2008

Screening for Colorectal Cancer: A Guidance Statement from the American College of Physicians – Annals of Internal Medicine 2012

Screening for Colorectal Cancer: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement – Annals of Internal Medicine 2008

Guidelines for Colonoscopy Surveillance after Polypectomy: A Consensus Update by the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer and the American Cancer Society – CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2006

Guidelines for Colonoscopy Surveillance after Cancer Resection: A Consensus Update by the American Cancer Society and US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer – CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians 2006