Colon Cancer Facts in New York and New Jersey 2011

Colon Cancer Blue Star
Screening for people over age 50 (colonoscopy and flex sig.)
 
Year
NJ
NY
US
2008
56.5%
63.6%
59.6%
2006
50.1%
55.0%
50.0%
2004
49.1%
47.6%
45.1%
 
 
Screening for people over age 50, by ethnicity/race
 
State
White, non-Hispanic
Black, non-Hispanic
Other non-Hispanic
Hispanic
US
62.12%
56.86%
51.36%
44.82%
NJ
58.62%
54.24%
42.70%
50.22%
NY
66.51%
58.10%
59.34%
56.70%
 

Estimated new cases/deaths, by state
New Jersey: An estimated 4,430 people in New Jersey will be diagnosed with colon cancer this year, and approximately 1,600 will die of the disease.
New York: An estimated 9,780 people in New York will be diagnosed with colon cancer this year, and approximately 3,120 will die of the disease.

Risk factors for colorectal cancer

Five myths about colorectal cancer

Colorectal screening for uninsured and underinsured
New Jersey:  New Jersey Cancer Education and Early Detection (NJCEED)
New York:  Cancer Services Program (CSP)
Call 1-800-227-2345 to be connected to the program in your community.

Guidelines for the early detection of colorectal cancer
Beginning at age 50, both men and women should follow one of these testing schedules:

Tests that find polyps and cancer
•    Flexible sigmoidoscopy every 5 years*, or
•    Colonoscopy every 10 years, or
•    Double-contrast barium enema every 5 years*, or
•    CT colonography (virtual colonoscopy) every 5 years*

Tests that primarily find cancer
•    Yearly fecal occult blood test (gFOBT)**, or
•    Yearly fecal immunochemical test (FIT) every year**, or
•    Stool DNA test (sDNA), interval uncertain**

* If the test is positive, a colonoscopy should be done.
** The multiple stool take-home test should be used. One test done by the doctor in the office is not adequate for testing. A colonoscopy should be done if the test is positive.

The tests that are designed to find both early cancer and polyps are preferred if these tests are available to you and you are willing to have one of these more invasive tests. Talk to your doctor about which test is best for you.

The American Cancer Society recommends that some people be screened using a different schedule because of their personal history or family history. Talk with your doctor about your history and what colorectal cancer screening schedule is best for you. For more information on colorectal cancer screening, please call the American Cancer Society and ask for our document, Colorectal Cancer: Early Detection.

Video – Get Tested for Colon Cancer, Here's How
Watch a video that explains the most commonly used screening methods, including test preparation, in simple language.
Link: http://www.cancer.org/Healthy/ToolsandCalculators/Videos/get-tested-for-colon-cancer-english