Helping Children When a Family Member has Cancer: Understanding Psychosocial Support Services

+ -Text Size

TOPICS

Previous Topic

To learn more

References

Christ GH, Christ AE. Current approaches to helping children cope with a parent’s terminal illness. CA Cancer J Clin. 2006;56:197−212.

Harpham WS. When a Parent Has Cancer: A guide to caring for your children. New York: HarperCollins, 2004.

Holland JC, Lewis S. The Human Side of Cancer: Living With Hope, Coping with Uncertainty. New York: HarperCollins, New York.

National Cancer Institute. Pediatric supportive care (PDQ®). Accessed at www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/supportivecare/pediatric/HealthProfessional on June 25, 2012.

National Cancer Institute: When Someone In Your Family Has Cancer. Accessed at www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/when-someone-in-your-family-archived/page1 on May 19, 2010. Content no longer available.

Pirl WF. Evidence Report on the Occurrence, Assessment, and Treatment of Depression in Cancer Patients. JNCI Monographs. 2004(32):32-39. Accessed at http://jncimono.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/2004/32/32 on June 25, 2012.

Watson M, St James-Roberts I, Ashley S, et al. Factors associated with emotional and behavioural problems among school age children of breast cancer patients. Br J Cancer. 2006;94:43−50.

Welch AS, Wadsworth ME, Compas BE. Adjustment of children and adolescents to parental cancer. Parents’ and children’s perspectives. Cancer. 1996;77:1409−1418.


Last Medical Review: 08/09/2012
Last Revised: 08/09/2012