What kind of smoker are you? Answer the following questions about your smoking habits. Then click the "Score Quiz" button for a profile of your nicotine dependence and some ideas about how to tame your cravings as you become a non-smoker.

The key to success in kicking the habit is to create a personal quit plan. You'll know more about how strongly addicted you are, and can use this information to help you design a detailed plan based on your smoking patterns. Many states have free counseling stop-smoking lines to help.

These suggestions are for adults who are not pregnant. Teens and pregnant women should talk with their doctors about how much they smoke, and what methods are most likely to work for and be safer for them.

1

How soon after you wake do you smoke your first cigarette?

2

Do you find it difficult to refrain from smoking in places where it is forbidden (for example, in church, at the library, at the movies)?

3

Which cigarette would you most hate to give up?

4

How many cigarettes per day do you smoke?

5

Do you smoke more frequently during the first hours after waking than during the rest of the day?

6

Do you smoke if you are so ill that you are in bed most of the day?

You do not have a strong physical dependence on nicotine, so you might consider quitting cold turkey—without a medicine to help you manage withdrawal symptoms. But even without much physical need, you could still have strong urges to smoke. That’s because smoking is an addiction, meaning that the habit is both physical and psychological (mental and emotional). If you smoke when you're bored, on the phone, under stress, or in a dozen other everyday situations, a support group or guidebook may help. Guidance is available online, too, in our (free) Guide to Quitting Smoking. Get your support lined up, make your plan, and pick your date.

Smoking cessation (stopping smoking) represents the single most important step that smokers can take to enhance the length and quality of their lives.

—Office of the US Surgeon General

You have a lower dependence on nicotine, but should still plan ahead to handle the cravings and other physical symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. You may want to consider using a nicotine replacement product (NRT) to ease withdrawal symptoms while you learn how to deal with the psychological (mental and emotional) triggers for smoking. If you smoke when you're bored, on the phone, under stress, or in a dozen other everyday situations a support group or guidebook may help.  Guidance is available online in our (free) Guide to Quitting Smoking, and ACS call specialists at 1-800-ACS-2345 can help you find a telephone stop smoking counseling line or support group in your area.

Smoking cessation (stopping smoking) represents the single most important step that smokers can take to enhance the length and quality of their lives.

—Office of the US Surgeon General

You are moderately dependent on nicotine. Consider using a nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) such as the patch and/or other medicine to help quit smoking, like Zyban®. Or you can try Chantix® without NRT. These medicines help ease cravings while you work on changing habits. Studies show these medicines can double your chances of quitting successfully. Support from family, friends, quitters' groups, or a telephone stop smoking counseling line are also very important.  Guidance is available online in our (free) Guide to Quitting Smoking, and ACS call specialists at 1-800-ACS-2345 can help you find a telephone stop-smoking counseling line or a support group in your area.

Smoking cessation (stopping smoking) represents the single most important step that smokers can take to enhance the length and quality of their lives.

—Office of the US Surgeon General

You are highly addicted to nicotine. You may want to talk with a doctor or cessation expert about using one or more stop-smoking medicines, which are proven to double your chances of success. Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) comes in different products to fit your pattern of cravings. Zyban® and Chantix® are other drugs that work to curb cravings and are available by prescription. Social support from family, friends, quitters' groups, or a telephone stop smoking counseling line is also very important. Guidance is available online in our (free) Guide to Quitting Smoking, and ACS call specialists at 1-800-ACS-2345 can help you find a telephone stop smoking counseling line or support group in your area.

Smoking cessation (stopping smoking) represents the single most important step that smokers can take to enhance the length and quality of their lives.

—Office of the US Surgeon General