What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Pituitary Tumors?

As you go through your diagnosis and treatment, you need to have honest, open discussions with your health care team. Ask any question, no matter how small it might seem. Here are some questions you might want to ask. Be sure to add your own as you think of them. Nurses, social workers, and other members of your treatment team may also be able to answer many of your questions.

  • How sure are you that I have a pituitary tumor? Could it be something else?
  • Has my tumor spread into the nearby brain tissue or other structures?
  • Is my tumor making excess hormones? If so, which one?
  • Do I need any other tests before we can decide on treatment?
  • Do I need to see any other types of doctors?
  • How much experience do you have treating this type of tumor?
  • Should I get a second opinion? Can you recommend a doctor or hospital?
  • Does the tumor need to be treated? If so, how soon do we need to start?
  • What are my treatment choices? What do you recommend? Why?
  • What is the goal of treatment (cure, keeping the tumor in check, etc.)?
  • What are the possible risks or side effects of treatment?
  • Will this treatment affect my ability to have children?
  • What should I do to be ready for treatment?
  • How long will treatment take? What will it be like? Where will it be given?
  • What is my expected prognosis (outlook)?
  • What will we do if the treatment doesn’t work or if the tumor comes back?
  • What type of follow-up will I need after treatment?

Along with these examples, be sure to write down any other questions you might want to ask. For instance, you might want information about recovery times so that you can plan your work or activity schedule. Or you may want to ask if you qualify for any clinical trials.

The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team

Our team is made up of doctors and oncology certified nurses with deep knowledge of cancer care as well as journalists, editors, and translators with extensive experience in medical writing.

Written by

The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team

Our team is made up of doctors and oncology certified nurses with deep knowledge of cancer care as well as journalists, editors, and translators with extensive experience in medical writing.

Last Revised: October 10, 2022