1

Skin cancer can almost always be cured if it’s found early.

The Correct Answer is True.

The most common types of skin cancer, basal cell cancers, squamous cell cancers, and melanoma, can almost always be cured in the early stages – when they’re small and have not spread..

2

Skin cancer is by far the most common type of cancer in the US

The Correct Answer is True.

According to one estimate, about 5.4 million cases of skin cancer are diagnosed among 3.3 million people each year. (Many people are diagnosed with more than one spot of skin cancer at the same time.)

The number of skin cancers among people older than 50 has been increasing for many years. This is probably from a combination of better skin cancer detection, people getting more sun exposure, and people living longer.

3

Skin cancer is not something young people have to worry about.

The Correct Answer is False.

The risk of skin cancer does go up with age, but these cancers are seen in younger people, too, probably because they're spending more time in the sun with their skin exposed. In fact, melanoma is one of the most common cancers in young adults – especially young women.

4

Tanning beds are a safe way to tan; they don’t cause skin cancer like sunlight does.

The Correct Answer is False.

Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays is a major risk factor for most skin cancers. While sunlight is the main source of UV rays, tanning beds and lamps also use UV rays.

UV rays damage the DNA of skin cells. Skin cancers start when this damage affects the DNA of genes that control skin cell growth. People who get a lot of UV exposure – no matter what the source – are at greater risk for skin cancer.

5

People with dark skin don’t need to worry about skin cancer.

The Correct Answer is False.

Everyone’s skin and eyes can be affected by the sun and other forms of UV rays. People with light skin are much more likely to have sun damage, but darker-skinned people, of any ethnicity, can be affected, too.

Having dark skin lowers the risk of melanoma at the more common sites, like the legs, back, and chest, but anyone can develop it on the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, and under the nails. In fact, melanomas in these areas account for more than half of all melanomas in African Americans but fewer than 1 in 10 melanomas in whites.

6

Skin cancer is easy to see – it always starts as a new dark-colored bump that’s tender.

The Correct Answer is False.

Skin cancers can show up in many colors, shapes, and sizes.

Basal cell cancers and squamous cell cancers are most often found in areas that get a lot of sun, like the head, neck, and arms, but they can occur anywhere on the body. Look for new growths, spots, bumps, patches, or sores that don’t heal after several weeks.

The most important warning sign for melanoma is a new spot on the skin or a spot that’s changing in size, shape, or color. Another important sign is a spot that looks different from all of the other spots on your skin.

Be sure to show a health care provider any areas on your skin that concern you and ask the provider to look at areas that may be hard for you to see. It’s sometimes hard to tell the difference between skin cancer and an ordinary mole, even for health care providers, so it’s important to show a provider any skin change that you are unsure of.

You answered out of 6 correctly.

We can help you learn the facts!

There’s more you need to know about skin cancer and what you can do about it. Check out our skin cancer section to learn more about this cancer and what you can do to find it early, help prevent it, and stay as healthy as possible. Most importantly, don’t forget to protect your skin whenever you’re outside! Check out our “Be Safe in the Sun” section to learn how to best protect yourself and the people you care about from damaging UV rays.

You answered out of 6 correctly.

Good job!

You’ve made a great start, but there are still some myths clouding your knowledge, and some facts you may not be aware of. Check the links in the answers you got wrong – they can take you right to the information you need. Check out our skin cancer section, too, to learn more about this cancer, how you can check your skin for it, and what you can do to help prevent it. Most importantly, don’t forget to protect your skin whenever you’re outside! Check out our “Be Safe in the Sun” section to learn how to best protect yourself and the people you care about from damaging UV rays.

You answered out of 6 correctly.

You have a strong understanding of skin cancer!

Congratulations! There’s always more to learn, so go to our skin cancer section to find out more about this cancer and what you can do to find it early, help prevent it, and stay as healthy as possible. Most importantly, don’t forget to protect your skin whenever you’re outside! Check out our “Be Safe in the Sun” section to learn how to best protect yourself and the people you care about from damaging UV rays.