HPV Texas graphic




Texas’ vaccination rate is surprisingly low.

Only 43.5% of kids receive the vaccine. Texas ranks 39th out of 50 states for HPV vaccine rates among children ages 13 to 17. We know Texas can do better!

What you need to know

HPV & Me

Watch stories of how HPV cancers have impacted people’s lives. 

Tamika Felder was diagnosed with cervical cancer at the age of 25. Now, as a cancer survivor, she shares her story to help educate others.

With heavy radiation and chemotherapy, and a supportive family and doctor, Scott Vetter shares his journey on becoming HPV cancer-free of head and neck cancer.

Justine Almada recalls what it took to take care of the mother as she underwent treatment for anal cancer. Today, she honors her mother’s legacy.

Diagnosed at 31 years old, Christine Baze recalls her story in becoming a cervical cancer survivor.

caucasian mother and daughter talking to doctor

 

 

Talk to your child's doctor

Ask your child’s doctor about the HPV vaccine. Getting vaccinated against HPV now is the best way to prevent HPV cancers later.
 

Where to get the HPV vaccine & how to pay for it

Parents can ask for the HPV vaccine at their child’s next doctor’s appointment or call 2-1-1 Texas to find a health care provider.

Insurance plans will probably cover the HPV vaccine cost if it is given according to national guidelines. But check with your insurance plan to be sure. The HPV vaccine is available to all uninsured or underinsured boys and girls between the ages of 9 and 18 through the Texas Vaccines for Children (TVFC) program

This program covers vaccine costs for children and teens who don’t have insurance. The TVFC program provides free vaccines to children and teens younger than 19 years of age, who are either Medicaid-eligible, American Indian or Alaska Native, or uninsured.

Project Partners

HPV cancer cannot be conquered alone. The Texas HPV Coalition is a group of dedicated health care professionals collaborating to stimulate work on key issues around HPV vaccination.