Nurture Your Emotional Health

happy senior couple running in the park

Taking care of your physical health by eating right and exercising is important, but taking care of your emotional health and having a sense of happiness and well-being is important, too. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines well-being as judging life positively and feeling good. According to the CDC, higher levels of well-being are linked to:

  • A lower risk of disease, illness, and injury – and speedier recovery
  • A better-functioning immune system
  • Longer life
  • More productivity at work

In other words, staying positive and happy can go a long way toward protecting your overall health. There are things you can do to achieve a greater sense of well-being, including these tips from the Mental Health America website:

  • Spend time with family and friends, and look for ways to meet new people.
  • Focus on the bright side of any situation, and banish negative thoughts.
  • Get regular physical activity, and eat a healthy diet that includes lots of vegetables and fruits.
  • Do something nice for someone else.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Laugh more. Do things you like.
  • Focus on your spiritual side, whether that means participating in organized religion, communing with nature, meditating, creating art, or whatever speaks to you.

According to the American Psychological Association, happy people are more likely to achieve success by working toward goals, finding the resources they need, and attracting others with their energy and optimism.

If you feel like you aren’t able to get happy or stay happy, you may benefit from professional help, and should make an appointment to see a doctor. Treatment, including medicines, counseling, or a combination of both, can reduce suffering and improve quality of life.

The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team
Our team is made up of doctors and master's-prepared nurses with deep knowledge of cancer care as well as journalists, editors, and translators with extensive experience in medical writing.


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