Understanding What Cancer Is: Ancient Times to Present

Oldest descriptions of cancer

Human beings and other animals have had cancer throughout recorded history. So it’s no surprise that from the dawn of history people have written about cancer. Some of the earliest evidence of cancer is found among fossilized bone tumors, human mummies in ancient Egypt, and ancient manuscripts. Growths suggestive of the bone cancer called osteosarcoma have been seen in mummies. Bony skull destruction as seen in cancer of the head and neck has been found, too.

Our oldest description of cancer (although the word cancer was not used) was discovered in Egypt and dates back to about 3000 BC. It’s called the Edwin Smith Papyrus and is a copy of part of an ancient Egyptian textbook on trauma surgery. It describes 8 cases of tumors or ulcers of the breast that were removed by cauterization with a tool called the fire drill. The writing says about the disease, “There is no treatment.”

Origin of the word cancer

The origin of the word cancer is credited to the Greek physician Hippocrates (460-370 BC), who is considered the “Father of Medicine.” Hippocrates used the terms carcinos and carcinoma to describe non-ulcer forming and ulcer-forming tumors. In Greek, these words refer to a crab, most likely applied to the disease because the finger-like spreading projections from a cancer called to mind the shape of a crab. The Roman physician, Celsus (28-50 BC), later translated the Greek term into cancer, the Latin word for crab. Galen (130-200 AD), another Greek physician, used the word oncos (Greek for swelling) to describe tumors. Although the crab analogy of Hippocrates and Celsus is still used to describe malignant tumors, Galen’s term is now used as a part of the name for cancer specialists – oncologists.

Cancer in the Sixteenth to Eighteenth Centuries

During the Renaissance, beginning in the 15th century, scientists developed greater understanding of the human body. Scientists like Galileo and Newton began to use the scientific method, which later was used to study disease. Autopsies, done by Harvey (1628), led to an understanding of the circulation of blood through the heart and body that had until then been a mystery.

In 1761, Giovanni Morgagni of Padua was the first to do something which has become routine today – he did autopsies to relate the patient’s illness to pathologic findings after death. This laid the foundation for scientific oncology, the study of cancer.

The famous Scottish surgeon John Hunter (1728-1793) suggested that some cancers might be cured by surgery and described how the surgeon might decide which cancers to operate on. If the tumor had not invaded nearby tissue and was “moveable,” he said, “There is no impropriety in removing it.”

A century later the development of anesthesia allowed surgery to flourish and classic cancer operations such as the radical mastectomy were developed.

Cancer in the Nineteenth Century

The 19th century saw the birth of scientific oncology with use of the modern microscope in studying diseased tissues. Rudolf Virchow, often called the founder of cellular pathology, provided the scientific basis for the modern pathologic study of cancer. As Morgagni had linked autopsy findings seen with the unaided eye with the clinical course of illness, so Virchow correlated microscopic pathology to illness.

This method not only allowed a better understanding of the damage cancer had done, but also aided the development of cancer surgery. Body tissues removed by the surgeon could now be examined and a precise diagnosis could be made. The pathologist could also tell the surgeon whether the operation had completely removed the cancer.

The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team

Our team is made up of doctors and oncology certified nurses with deep knowledge of cancer care as well as journalists, editors, and translators with extensive experience in medical writing.

Contran R, Kumar V, Robbins S. Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease, 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: WB Saunders; 1989.

Devita VT Jr, Rosenberg SA. Two Hundred Years of Cancer Research. N Engl J Med. 2012;366(23):2207-2214.

Diamandopoulus GT. Cancer: An historical perspective. Anticancer Res. 1996;16:1595-1602.

Gallucci BB. Selected concepts of cancer as a disease: From the Greeks to 1900. Oncol Nurs Forum. 1985;12:67-71.

Hajdu SI. A Note From History: Landmarks in History of Cancer, Part 1. Cancer. 2011;117(5):1097-1102.

Hajdu SI. A Note From History: Landmarks in History of Cancer, Part 2. Cancer. 2011;117(12):2811-2820.

Hajdu SI. A Note From History: Landmarks in History of Cancer, Part 3. Cancer. 2012;118(4):1155-1168.

Hajdu SI. A Note From History: Landmarks in History of Cancer, Part 4. Cancer. 2012;118(20):4914-4928.

Institut Jules Bordet. The History of Cancer. Accessed at www.bordet.be/en/presentation/history/cancer_e/cancer1.htm on June 8, 2012.

Kardinal C, Yarbro J. A conceptual history of cancer. Semin Oncol. 1979;6:396-408.

References

Contran R, Kumar V, Robbins S. Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease, 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: WB Saunders; 1989.

Devita VT Jr, Rosenberg SA. Two Hundred Years of Cancer Research. N Engl J Med. 2012;366(23):2207-2214.

Diamandopoulus GT. Cancer: An historical perspective. Anticancer Res. 1996;16:1595-1602.

Gallucci BB. Selected concepts of cancer as a disease: From the Greeks to 1900. Oncol Nurs Forum. 1985;12:67-71.

Hajdu SI. A Note From History: Landmarks in History of Cancer, Part 1. Cancer. 2011;117(5):1097-1102.

Hajdu SI. A Note From History: Landmarks in History of Cancer, Part 2. Cancer. 2011;117(12):2811-2820.

Hajdu SI. A Note From History: Landmarks in History of Cancer, Part 3. Cancer. 2012;118(4):1155-1168.

Hajdu SI. A Note From History: Landmarks in History of Cancer, Part 4. Cancer. 2012;118(20):4914-4928.

Institut Jules Bordet. The History of Cancer. Accessed at www.bordet.be/en/presentation/history/cancer_e/cancer1.htm on June 8, 2012.

Kardinal C, Yarbro J. A conceptual history of cancer. Semin Oncol. 1979;6:396-408.

Last Revised: January 4, 2018

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