Can Cervical Cancer Be Found Early?

The best way to find cervical cancer early is to have regular screening tests. The tests for cervical cancer screening are the HPV test and the Pap test. These tests can be done alone or at the same time (called a co-test). Regular screening has been shown to prevent cervical cancers and save lives. The most important thing to remember is to get screened regularly, no matter which test you get.

Early detection greatly improves the chances of successful treatment of pre-cancers and cancer. Being aware of any signs and symptoms of cervical cancer can also help avoid delays in diagnosis.

For more information about using the HPV test and the Pap test to find cervical cancer early, see The American Cancer Society Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer.

The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team

Our team is made up of doctors and oncology certified nurses with deep knowledge of cancer care as well as journalists, editors, and translators with extensive experience in medical writing.

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Last Medical Review: January 3, 2020 Last Revised: July 30, 2020

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